1. Chair sitting

June 26, 2007

Chair sitting. The body should be erect with face forward. The nose and navel and the ears and shoulders should be in alignment. The chin is slightly drawn in and the shoulders level. The waist should be straight and our seat stable. The spine should not be stretched too straight, but neither should it be bent. Relax all the muscles of the body without using any strength and be relaxed and natural.

Text taken from the book Cheng Man-Ch’ing’s Advanced T’ai-Chi Form Instructions by Douglas Wile


2. Cross-legged sitting

June 26, 2007

Cross-legged sitting. Both legs are bent and the right foot is placed underneath the left thigh. The left foot is placed on the right thigh. This is the half-lotus posture. The full-lotus used by monks is even better. Another posture is the simple-seat, with legs crossed and feet under knees. In general, choose the most comfortable.

Text taken from the book Cheng Man-Ch’ing’s Advanced T’ai-Chi Form Instructions by Douglas Wile


3. Hand position

June 26, 2007

Hand position. The two hands, hanging naturally, are place with the palms up on top of the legs. The palms are placed on top of each other with the tips of the thumbs touching and the “tiger’s mouth” facing forward as if holding an object. The hands rest lightly in front of the stomach on to of the calves without pressure and naturally relaxed.

Text taken from the book Cheng Man-Ch’ing’s Advanced T’ai-Chi Form Instructions by Douglas Wile


4. Reclining

June 26, 2007

Reclining. Lying with the face up (too soft an inner spring mattress is not suitable), the back should be level and straight. The feet are extended level, with the toes pointing upward and naturally relaxed. The palms should face inward, lightly toucing the sides of the thighs. The height of the pillow can be adjusted for comfort. All the muscles of the body should be relaxed. The eyes gaze in the direction of the abdomen.

Text taken from the book Cheng Man-Ch’ing’s Advanced T’ai-Chi Form Instructions by Douglas Wile